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Extracted from the Australian Competition and Consumer Affairs website ScamWatch


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This article contains information extracted from the ScamWatch website in Australia and if the information here is claimed to infringe copyright it will be removed immediately. To visit the site you may be offered an opportunity to register to get news on new scams. To visit the site click on the image below.

Some of the information may be relevant to Australia only e.g authorities to contact if you are a victim.

Card skimming
What is card skimming?
Warning signs
Protect yourself from card skimming
Do your homework
Decide
Report them

What is card skimming?
‘Card skimming’ is the illegal copying of information from the magnetic strip of a credit or ATM card. It is a more direct version of a phishing scam. The scammers try to steal your details so they can access your accounts. Once scammers have skimmed your card, they can create a fake or ‘cloned’ card with your details on it. The scammer is then able to run up charges on your account. Card skimming is also a way for scammers to steal your identity (your personal details) and use it to commit identity fraud. By stealing your personal details and account numbers the scammer may be able to borrow money or take out loans in your name.

Warning signs A shop assistant takes your card out of your sight in order to process your transaction. You are asked to swipe your card through more than one machine. You see a shop assistant swipe the card through a different machine to the one you used. You notice something suspicious about the card slot on an ATM (e.g. an attached device). You notice unusual or unauthorised transactions on your account or credit card statement. Protect yourself from card skimming Keep your credit card and ATM cards safe. Do not share your personal identity number (PIN) with anyone.  Do not keep any written copy of your PIN with the card. Check your bank account and credit card statements when you get them. If you see a transaction you cannot explain, report it to your credit union or bank Choose passwords that would be difficult for anyone else to guess. As well as following these specific tips, find out how to protect yourself from all sorts of other scams.

Do your homework
If you are using an ATM, take the time to check that there is nothing suspicious about the machine.
Ask yourself if you trust the person or trader who you are handing your card over to. If a shop assistant looks like they are going to take your card out of your sight, ask if it is really necessary.

Decide
If an ATM looks suspicious, do not use it and alert the ATM owner.
If you are in a shop and the assistant wants to swipe your card out of your sight, or in a second machine, you should ask for your card back straight away and either pay with a cheque or cash, or not make the purchase.

Report them
If you think you have seen a card skimming scam, you should contact the bank, credit union or credit card provider that has been targeted. 
If you think your card has been skimmed, contact your bank or credit card supplier immediately to report it.
Warn your family and friends about the scam. 

Similar scams:

Requests for your account information ('phishing' scams)

Phishing emails are fake emails usually pretending to be from banks or other financial institutions. They make up some reason for you to give your account details and then use these details to steal your money. Phoney fraud alerts
Scammers pretend to be from your bank or financial institution and tell you that there is a problem with your account. They ask for your account details to protect your money, but then use these details to steal your money.
Credit card scams
There are many types of scams that aim to steal your credit card details, either by taking the card itself or by tricking you into giving them the card’s details.  
Spyware & key-loggersSpyware is a type of software that spies on what you do on your computer. Key-loggers record what keys you press on your keyboard. Scammers can use them to steal your online banking passwords or other personal information.

Chain letters & pyramid schemes
Chain letters and pyramid schemes are some of the oldest scams going around. They can cost a lot of people money, as they spread like a virus. People who become involved in these scams can only make money by scamming other people.

Pyramid schemes and chain letters are often promoted by people you know and trust, but who may not realise that they are taking part in an illegal scam.
These scams are often very easy to spot and avoid if you know what to look for. 
Chain letters
Chain letter scams falsely promise financial or other benefits for a relatively small cost. 

Pyramid schemes
Illegal schemes that always collapse when the supply of victims dries up, leaving nearly everyone involved much worse off.

Similar scams:

Guaranteed employment / income scams
Scammers ‘guarantee’ you a job or certain level of income, tricking you into paying an up-front fee for a ‘business plan’ or materials.
Business opportunity scams
There are a range of scams marketed as business opportunities. They promise success but usually only the promoter makes any money. 
Work from home scams
Employment opportunities that promise huge incomes with little work – usually by asking you to transfer money for someone else or recruit new victims.

Health and medical scams
These scams try to make money by exploiting people who have a medical condition or who are worried about their health. The scammers offer solutions or cures where none exist or promise to simplify complex health treatments.
Like the other scams featured on SCAMwatch, health and medical scams can end up costing you a lot of money. However, these scams can also do significant damage to you health.
If you try a phoney medicine or treatment, use a dangerous weight loss technique or take medicine that you buy from an unqualified internet scammer, you could be putting your health at great risk.

Miracle cures
Miracle cure scams prey on the sick or desperate by selling drugs or treatments that don’t work or are even dangerous. 
Weight loss scams
False claims are made to mislead you into buying ‘revolutionary’ pills, creams, diet advice or machines. 
Fake online pharmacies
Fake online pharmacies offer drugs and medicines at very cheap prices or without a prescription. They can cause you major health and money problems.

Similar scams:

Spam (junk mail) offers
Spam emails, SMS or MMS usually offer free goods or ‘prizes’, very cheap products or promises of wealth. Responding to spam messages can result problems for you computer and your bank account. 
Dating & romance scams
Scams that exploit your romantic or compassionate side through expensive dating services, or pretending to be interested but then asking for money. 
Psychic & clairvoyant scams
Psychic scammers claim that you are in danger or predict trouble and offer a solution, such as ‘winning’ lottery numbers or a lucky charm – for a hefty fee. 
Credit card scams
There are many types of scams that aim to steal your credit card details, either by taking the card itself or by tricking you into giving them the card’s details.

Identity theft

What is identity theft? How does identity theft work? Warning signs Protect yourself Do your homework Decide Report them Related scams


What is identity theft?
Identity theft is a type of fraud which involves stealing money or gaining other benefits by pretending to be someone else. Having your identity stolen can be both financially and emotionally devastating.
Identity theft can occur in many ways from somebody using your credit card details illegally to make purchases to having your entire identity assumed by another person to open bank accounts, take out loans and conducting illegal business under your name.

How does identity theft work?
Identity theft works in a range of ways - from crude methods to well organised scams.
Many of us have a wealth of personal information readily available - cards in our wallet, mail, public records, information saved in our computers and information posted on social networking sites.
Identity theft can happen easily and quickly. By leaving your personal information readily available, scammers will have easy access to this information. For example, scammers will pay people to rummage through rubbish tips and steal letters (‘dumpster diving’) to collect personal information. However, despite your best efforts, a determined scammer can also create elaborate and cunning plans to trick you into providing your personal details. For example:
By sending an email that looks like it comes from your bank, financial institution or telecommunications provider. Known as phishing scams, these emails are all about tricking you into handing over your personal and banking details to scammers. Most work by including special links in the email to take you to a combination of genuine and spoofed websites.
Phoney fraud alerts are similar to phishing scams where scammers trick you into handing over your personal details. A common fraud alert involves the scammer pretending to be from your bank informing you that your credit card or account has been cancelled because of suspicious criminal activity (various excuses are used). They will then trick you to provide account details to ‘confirm’ your identity. Bogus job opportunities are usually posted on job websites. The scammer may use or sell your personal information provided in the job application.

Warning signs
You get an email, SMS or a phone call out of the blue asking you to ‘validate’ or ‘confirm’ banking details.You notice that amounts of money go missing from your bank account without any explanations.
The caller pushes you to provide personal information and discourages you from checking if it’s a genuine request.You are unable to obtain credit or a loan because of an inexplicably bad credit rating.

Protect yourself
NEVER send money or give personal details to people you don’t know and trust.If you receive a call from your bank or any other organisation, don’t provide your personal details—instead ask for their name and a contact number. Check with the organisation in question before calling back. NEVER rely on a number provided in an email or click on the provided link—instead find the contact number through an internet search or check the back of your ATM card. If you receive a request from a friend or family member stranded while on holiday asking you to transfer money to them, contact them by phone or alternative contact to verify the request is genuine before sending any money or providing personal details.
Regularly check your credit card and/or bank statements to ensure that suspicious transactions are detected.
Shred all documents containing personal information, such as credit card applications and bank statements.
Log directly onto websites you are interested in rather than clicking on links provided in an email.
Always get independent advice if you are unsure whether an offer or request is genuine.

Do your homework
Be suspicious if anyone asks you for your personal information. Scammers will use convincing stories to explain why you need to give them money or your personal details.
Always take your time to check whether it is a genuine request. Seeking a second opinion from a family member or friend can be helpful. If you are still unsure about whether an offer or request is genuine, seek professional advice from your bank, an accountant or lawyer.
And remember, a legitimate bank or financial institution will NEVER email you asking you to follow a link or asking you for personal details. If you believe the email is genuine, telephone your bank or financial institution to let them know about the email and ask their advice. DO NOT call using any telephone number listed in the email—use a number that appears on your statement or card or in the telephone book. Many banks and financial institutions now have specialised internet security staff who can help you.

Decide
You should NEVER give out your personal or bank account details to somebody you don’t know and trust. NEVER send your credit card or bank details in an email. 

Don’t be tricked by an email that looks legitimate or appears to link to a genuine website. The best defense is to delete the email before you even open it and then contact your bank. 

If you receive a phone call that you think may be genuine, you should not ignore the possibility that there actually has been some fraud with your bank account or credit card. Ask the caller for details, then hang up and call your bank or credit union to tell them what has happened. Make sure the phone number you ring is genuine - use a number that appears on your statement or card or in the telephone book.

Report them
If you think your identity has been misused, you should contact your bank or credit card supplier to let them know. 
Tell your friends and family about the scam so they know what to be on the look out for if they are targeted.

Investment scams (get-rich-quick)

Investment scams can come in many forms—from an unexpected phone call offering an investment opportunity to an email encouraging you to buy shares that are about to go up based on 'secret' information. You could be offered early access to your super, gambling software or promised large tax deductions or refunds. When you take part in an investment scam, you will probably lose a lot of money and may end up in considerable debt. If you invest in a dodgy tax scheme, you could also be liable to pay back any missing tax plus interest and penalties on top of losing your investment.

If you are approached by somebody out of the blue who offers you an investment opportunity, say 'No' and hang up the phone or delete the email. It is the best thing to do.
Do not rely on advice from the person trying to sell you the investment. Always seek independent financial and/or legal advice before making any investment decision.
Download our Sports investment scams fact sheet for more information. Visit the Australian Tax Office website for more information on dodgy tax schemes. 

Cold calling (investment telemarketing)
Unsolicited phone calls pushing high-return and high-risk investments, often in overseas markets. The callers sound professional but are not licensed in Australia. 
Share promotions & 'hot tips'
Spam email or strange phone messages that urge you to buy shares in a thinly-traded company. The scammers wait until their victims invest before selling their own stock at a profit. 
Investment seminars & real estate scams
High-pressure sales in high-risk investment strategies. Scammers profit through attendance fees and by selling property and investments at inflated prices. 
Sports investment scams
Expensive software packages that promise to predict the results of sporting events or share market movements. When they fail to work as promised, refunds are hard to come by. 
Superannuation scams
You are offered early access to your superannuation (‘early release’), often through a self-managed super fund. The scammers take a large part of your super for themselves, and put you at risk for accessing your super in an illegal way.

Similar scams:

Business opportunity scams
There is a range of scams marketed as business opportunities. They promise success but usually only the promoter makes any money. 
Guaranteed employment / income scams
Scammers ‘guarantee’ you a job or certain level of income, tricking you into paying an up-front fee for a ‘business plan’ or materials. 
Pyramid schemes
Illegal schemes that always collapse when the supply of victims dries up, leaving nearly everyone involved much worse off. 
Up-front payment scams
You are asked to send money upfront for a product or ‘reward’. You will end up with something much less than you expected, or nothing at all.
'Nigerian 419' scams
You are promised huge rewards if you help someone transfer money out of their country by paying fees or giving them your bank account details.

Job and employment scams
Job and employment scams target people looking for a new job or a change of job. They often promise a lot of income (sometimes they even guarantee it) for not a lot of work.
You should be very careful of someone who uses spam email or ads posted in the street to employ people. They are often only interested in earning money from you! 

Work from home scams
Employment opportunities that promise huge incomes with little work – usually by asking you to transfer money for someone else or recruit new victims. 
Guaranteed employment / income scams
Scammers ‘guarantee’ you a job or certain level of income, tricking you into paying an up-front fee for a ‘business plan’ or materials. 
Business opportunity scams
There is a range of scams marketed as business opportunities. They promise success but usually only the promoter makes any money.

Similar scams:

Transferring money for someone else
If you agree to transfer money for someone you don’t know, you let scammers use your bank account to ‘launder’ their dirty money. This puts you and your money in the firing line. 
Pyramid schemes
Illegal schemes that always collapse when the supply of victims dries up, leaving nearly everyone involved much worse off. 
Sports investment scams
Expensive software packages that promise to predict the results of sporting events or share market movements. When they fail to work as promised, refunds are hard to come by.

Lottery and competition scams (fake prizes)
Lottery and competition scams are delivered in many ways—in person, over the telephone, through the post or by email. The scammer will tell you that you’ve won something substantial (such as a large sum of money or a great prize) and that all you have to do is send them money to claim the prize.

Rather than winning a prize, you could lose a lot of money.
If you are told that you’ve won a lottery or competition and you are not sure that you entered it, the best thing to do is to say ‘no’. Hang up the phone, delete the email or throw away the letter.

ALWAYS seek independent financial and/or legal advice before deciding to send money, and never give your banking details to anybody you are not completely sure of.

Lottery and sweepstake scams
Fake lottery or sweepstakes ‘winnings’ to tempt you into sending money or your personal details. 
Unexpected 'prizes'
Unexpected prizes that need you to send money to claim—you may never receive the prize or it may not be what you expected.

Similar scams:

SMS competition & trivia scams
You are encouraged to enter a competition or trivia contest over SMS for a great prize – but misled about your chances or how much it will cost to take part. 
Up-front payment scams
You are asked to send money upfront for a product or ‘reward’. You will end up with something much less than you expected, or nothing at all.

Mobile phone scams
Scams that come to you on your mobile can be difficult to recognise. They might come from somebody who talks as if they know you; they might come through a 'missed call' from an unknown number that you redial; or they might be upfront about what they are promoting, but have hidden charges.
You might be offered free or cheap ring tones, or the chance to win fantastic prizes.
When you reply to these messages or calls, you may find yourself disappointed in the product or signed up to a service you don't want or cannot stop. You could be left facing a huge phone bill.
If you receive a missed call or text message from an unknown number, the best thing to do is to delete the message or ignore the call.
Always do your homework before you agree to any offer you receive over your mobile and never agree to any offer that you are not completely sure about. 

Ring tone scams
Misleading offers for ‘free’ or cheap ring tones that end up being a subscription or premium rate service. Missed calls & text messages from unknown numbers
Missed calls that can lead to premium rate charges. Mysterious text messages that can cost a lot of money if your reply to them. 
SMS competition & trivia scams
You are encouraged to enter a competition or trivia contest over SMS for a great prize – but misled about your chances or how much it will cost to take part.

Similar scams:

Unexpected 'prizes'
Unexpected prizes that need you to send money to claim—you may never receive the prize or it may not be what you expected.

Money transfer requests ('Nigerian' scams)
With the rise of internet banking it is easy to transfer money across the world in minutes. Unfortunately, this has also meant an increase in the number and types of scams that try to trick you into sending your hard-earned cash to overseas scammers.
The scammers may promise huge rewards or what looks like an easy way to make money. Other scammers trick people who are trying to buy or sell products over the internet.
Some common scams that involve transferring money are described below. Regardless of what the scammer tells you, you should be very cautious about sending money to someone you don't know. Remember that once you send money to someone, it can be very difficult to get it back—especially if they are based overseas.

'Nigerian 419' scams
You are promised huge rewards if you help someone transfer money out of their country by paying fees or giving them your bank account details. 
Up-front payment scams
You are asked to send money upfront for a product or ‘reward’. You will end up with something much less than you expected, or nothing at all. Transferring money for someone else
If you agree to transfer money for someone you don’t know, you let scammers use your bank account to ‘launder’ their dirty money. This puts you and your money in the firing line. 
Cheque overpayment scams
You are sent a cheque for something you have sold, but it is for more than the amount agreed. The scammer hopes you will refund the extra money before you notice that their cheque has bounced.

Similar scams:

Requests for your account information ('phishing' scams)
Phishing emails are fake emails usually pretending to be from banks or other financial institutions. They make up some reason for you to give your account details and then use these details to steal your money. 
Charity scams
Taking advantage of people’s generosity and kindness by asking for donations to a fake charity, or impersonating a real charity.

Online scams
The rise of the internet has opened up the world to millions of people. It is now possible to do things that were unheard of only ten or even five years ago.
Unfortunately the internet is not free from scams and scammers. Some scams are especially designed to take advantage of the way the internet works.
A lot of internet scams take place without the victim even noticing. It is only when their credit card statement or phone bill arrives that the person realises that they might have been scammed.

There are, however, several ways to protect yourself from internet scams. They are simple but essential precautions you can take because you often cannot be sure exactly who you are dealing with on the internet.
How you access the internet can also make a difference. If you take the right precautions, the chances of being scammed are greatly reduced.

Auction & shopping scams
Online auctions can be rigged by scammers or used to target you for a scam outside of the auction site. You could end up with a dud product or nothing at all for your money. 
Domain name renewal scams
Scams that send you a fake renewal notice for your actual domain name, or a misleading invoice for a domain name that is very similar to your own. 
Spam (junk mail) offers
Spam emails, SMS or MMS usually offer free goods or ‘prizes’, very cheap products or promises of wealth. Responding to spam messages can result problems for you computer and your bank account. 
'Free' offers on the internet
Offers of ‘free’ website access, downloads, holidays, shares or product trials – but you have to supply your credit card or other personal details. 
Modem jacking
Modem-jacking scams secretly change the phone number dial-up modems use to access the internet to an overseas or premium rate phone number. You could pay hundreds of dollars extra. 
Spyware & key-loggers
Spyware is a type of software that spies on what you do on your computer. Key-loggers record what keys you press on your keyboard. Scammers can use them to steal your online banking passwords or other personal information.

Similar scams:

'Nigerian 419' scams
You are promised huge rewards if you help someone transfer money out of their country by paying fees or giving them your bank account details. 
Transferring money for someone else
If you agree to transfer money for someone you don’t know, you let scammers use your bank account to ‘launder’ their dirty money. This puts you and your money in the firing line. 
Ring tone scams
Misleading offers for ‘free’ or cheap ring tones that end up being a subscription or premium rate service. Up-front payment scams
You are asked to send money upfront for a product or ‘reward’. You will end up with something much less than you expected, or nothing at all. 

Small business scams
Scams that target small business can come in a number of forms—from bills for advertising or directory listings that you never ordered, dodgy office supply offers, to false claims of government requirements needing you to send money. The best defence you have is to make your business as protected as possible—by limiting how many people have authority to buy or order anything, keeping written records of all orders and purchases and by making sure you only deal with people you know and trust. 

Scams: protect your business from them is an ACCC brochure with more information and tips about common small business scams.
Don't let tactics like bullying, negotiations for a lower price or charges for unordered/unused goods affect your decision.
Do not rely on information given to you by whoever offers you a particular product or service—always seek independent advice if the product or service will involve a significant amount of money or other commitment. 

Directories and advertising (false billing)
Small businesses can be misled into paying for a directory listing or other advertisement that may not exist or was not authorised. 
Fax back scams
Unsolicited faxes offer great deals on products, entry into competitions or huge discounts, but the high costs of replying to the fax are buried in the fine print or not provided at all. 
Office supply scams
Your small businesses may be invoiced for office supplies you never ordered, never received or were not what you thought you agreed to.

Similar scams:

Domain name renewal scams
Scams that send you a fake renewal notice for your actual domain name, or a misleading invoice for a domain name that is very similar to your own. 
Business opportunity scams
There is a range of scams marketed as business opportunities. They promise success but usually only the promoter makes any money.

More scams ...
Scammers are devious but very inventive people. They are always trying to come up with new ways to trick you and steal your money. The scams below are some of the most common scams. While they have been around for a while, these scams are often adapted to new technology as well as current trends and events.

Psychic & clairvoyant scams
Psychic scammers claim that you are in danger or predict trouble and offer a solution, such as ‘winning’ lottery numbers or a lucky charm – for a hefty fee. 
Dating & romance scams
Scams that exploit your romantic or compassionate side through expensive dating services, or pretending to be interested but then asking for money. 
Charity scams
Taking advantage of people’s generosity and kindness by asking for donations to a fake charity, or impersonating a real charity. 
Door-to-door & home maintenance scams
You may be pressured into buying goods which do not live up to the seller’s claims or charged for work you did not agree to or is substandard.

How to protect yourself
A scammer will approach almost everyone at some stage. Some scams are very easy to spot while other scams may appear to be genuine offers or bargains. Scams can even take place without you doing anything at all.
Most scams need you to do something before they can work. You may send money to someone based on a promise that turns out to be false. You may give your personal details to people who turn out to be scammers. Some scams rely on you agreeing to deals without getting advice first or buying a product without checking it out properly.
The simple tips below will help you protect yourself and your family from scams. Scams can cost people a lot of money and cause a great deal of distress. By following these simple tips, you can protect yourself against scams.

Golden rules Digging a little deeper Protect your identity Sending or transferring money Dealing with a face-to-face approach Telephone traps Dealing with suspicious or unsolicited offers sent by email or SMS Internet tips Protecting your business Keeping children safe online: Cybersmart
Find out more about scams

Golden rules

If it looks too good to be true—it probably is. Use your common sense: the offer may be a scam. ALWAYS get independent advice if an offer involves significant money, time or commitment. Remember there are no get-rich-quick schemes: the only people who make money are the scammers. Do not agree to offers or deals straight away: tell the person that you are not interested or that you want to get some independent advice before making a decision.
You can contact your local office of fair trading, for assistance.
NEVER send money or give credit card or online account details to anyone you do not know and trust. Check your bank account and credit card statements when you get them. If you see a transaction you cannot explain, report it to your credit union or bank. Keep your credit and ATM cards safe. Do not share your personal identity number with anyone. Do not keep any written copy of your PIN with the card

Digging a little deeper

Do not let anyone pressure you into making decisions about money or investments: always get independent financial advice. Read all the terms and conditions of any offer very carefully: claims of free or very cheap offers often have hidden costs. Make sure you know how to stop any subscription service you want to sign up to. Be very careful about offers for medicines, supplements or other treatments: always seek the advice of your health care professional. Remember there are no magic pills or safe options for rapid weight loss. Beware of products or schemes that claim to guarantee income or winnings. If someone offers you an investment or other financial service, ask for their Financial Services Licence number:  Be wary of investments promising a high return with little or no risk. Beware of job offers that require you to pay an upfront fee.

Protect your identity

Only give out your personal details and information where it is absolutely necessary and where you have initiated the contact and trust the other party. Destroy personal information, don’t just throw it out. You should cut up, burn or shred old bills, statements or cards so scammers can not get your personal details from them later. Treat your personal details as you would treat money: don’t leave them lying around for others to take. Order a free copy of your credit report every year to make sure no one is using your name to borrow money or run up debts.

Sending or transferring money

Never send money to anyone you are not totally sure about. Do not send any money or pay any fee to claim a prize or lottery winnings. Money laundering is a criminal offence: do not agree to transfer money for someone else. Make sure that cheques have been cleared by your bank before transferring or wiring any refunds or overpayments back to the sender. Do not pass on chain letters or take part in pyramid schemes: you will lose your money and could lose your friends.

Dealing with a face-to-face approach

If someone comes to your door, ask to see their identification. You do not have to let them in and they MUST leave if you ask them to. Contact your local fair trading agency if you are unsure about an offer or trader. Remember that family members and friends may try to involve you in a scam without realising that it is a scam: you should seek independent advice (from a lawyer or financial adviser).

Telephone traps

If you receive a phone call out of the blue, always ask for the name of the person you are speaking to and who they represent. Do not give your personal, credit card or online account details over the phone unless you made the call and the phone number came from a trusted source. It is best not to respond to text messages or missed calls that come from numbers you don’t recognise. Be careful of 5 digit phone numbers beginning with 3. These are charged at a premium rate and can be very expensive. Look out for SMS and MMS numbers that start with 3.  These are charged at a premium rate (sometimes even for receiving a message) and can be very expensive.

Dealing with suspicious or unsolicited offers sent by email or SMS

Do not open suspicious or unsolicited emails (spam): delete them. Do not click on any links in a spam email, or open any files attached to them. Never call a telephone number that you see in a spam email or SMS. NEVER reply to a spam email or SMS (even to unsubscribe).

Internet tips

Talk to your Internet service provider about spam filtering or, alternatively, purchase spam-filtering software. If you want to access an internet account website, use a book marked link or type the address in yourself: NEVER follow a link in an email. Install software that protects your computer from viruses and unwanted programs and make sure it is kept up-to-date. Beware of free websites and downloads (such as music, adult sites, games and movies). They may install harmful programs without you knowing. Check the website address carefully. Scammers often set up fake websites with very similar addresses. Never enter your personal, credit card or online account information on a website that you are not certain is genuine. Never send your personal, credit card or online account details by email. Try to avoid using public computers (at libraries or internet cafes) to do your Internet banking. Do not use software on your computer that auto-completes online forms. This can give Internet scammers easy access to your personal and credit card details. Choose passwords that would be difficult for anyone else to guess.

Protecting your business

Never give out or clarify any information about your business unless you know what the information will be used for. Never agree to any business proposal on the phone: always ask for an offer in writing. Try to avoid having a large number of people authorised to make orders or pay invoices. Always check that goods or services were both ordered and delivered before paying an invoice. Make sure the business billing you is the one you normally deal with. If you are unsure about any part of a business offer, ask for more information or seek independent advice.

Keeping children safe online: Cybersmart
This section is relevant to Australia only
The Cybersmart program is a national cybersafety education program managed by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA). It provides a comprehensive range of information, resources and presentations designed to meet the needs of children, parents, teachers and library staff.
The ACMA Cybersmart website is home to all its cybersafety resources, research and activities. For more information, visit Cybersmart or contact the Cybersafety Contact Centre on 1800 880 176 (from within Australia).
The source of this information and much more can be found by clicking on the following image.

The source of this information and much more can be found by clicking on the following image.

 

 
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